May 19-22: Global Scrum Alliance Gathering | AUS-TX

An amazing 2019 Global Scrum Alliance Gathering (May 19-22), organized by SA staff that brought together a record-high number of professionals from around the globe and had countless amazing events – too many to describe them all in one newsletter. 🙂
Here, I would like to  recap what committed to my memory the most:
  • Keynote presentation by Daniel Pink
  • My personal experience from servicing the ‘Fans of LeSS’ booth, attended by hundreds of people
  • Highlights of my own presentation that draw more than 100 people: “How to Stop Deterioration of Coaching Quality: Industrially and Organizationally” and feedback from the room
  • Coaches Clinic and Coaches/Trainers Retreat highlights 

Keynote Presentation by Daniel H. Pink

During his keynote presentation, Daniel H. Pink (the best-selling author, contributing editor and co-executive producer, known world-wide) shared the highlights of his new book: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing.

Pink’s Synopsis: “We all know that timing is everything. Trouble is, we don’t know much about timing itself. Our business and professional lives present a never-ending stream of ‘when’ decisions. But we make them based on intuition and guesswork. Timing, we believe, is an art.  But timing is a really a science – one we can use to make smarter decisions, enhance our productivity, and boost the performance of our organizations.

Some highlights from Pink’s talk:

Scientifically and statistically, both humans and apes, have the lowest well-being at mid-life.

Therefore, D.Pink’s recommendation on how to deal with such unpleasant mid-points, are as follows:

  • Beware [of such mid-points]
  • Use midpoints to wake up rather than roll over
  • Imagine you’re a little behind

Then, D. Pink also stressed that there are hidden patterns of how time-of-day affects our analytic and creative capabilities – and how simple work rearrangements can improve our effectiveness. For example, when a person makes an appointment to a physician, it is best to ask for a morning time slot, instead of afternoon slot, since physicians tend to have more analytical capabilities before lunch.

D. Pink’s next point was that as individuals get older, at the end of each decade, they are more prone to take certain actions that psychologically make them feel younger. As an example, he used statistical data of marathon runners: people are most likely to run their first marathon at the ages that are just at the brink of next decade: e.g. 29 or 49 years old.

“Because the approach of a new decade… functions as a marker of progress through the life span…people are more apt to evaluate their lives as a chronological decade ends, than they are at other times.”- Daniel H. Pink
How about psychological reaction to the fact that something will be GONE and the time when it will happen is coming up shortly?

In one case study (left image), when a person was given one chocolate candy at a time, and was asked to give feedback about its taste, a response was usually consistent, for each subsequent candy. However, as soon as a person was told that it was the last candy to taste, feedback about how a candy tasted became significantly more positive.

In another case study (right image), when a group of people was asked to fill out a survey, in order to receive a certificate, before it expired, responses were different, when conditions were set as “will expire in 3 weeks” vs. “will expire in two months”.  Apparently, proximity of expiration date made people much more responsive to the request to fill out a survey.

D.Pink’s next point was about how half-time checks can shape our behavior and impact final results. According to D. Pink, scientists and researchers really like statistical data from sports because it is ‘clean’.  Here, using an example of basketball teams, when teams play a game, the following can be observed, depending on half-time results:

  • Being significantly behind – usually results in a loss
  • Being significantly ahead – usually results in a victory
  • Being slightly behind – motivates people to step up and put an extra effort, which results ultimate victory
  • Being slightly ahead – makes people relaxed, less focused and less persuasive, which results in ultimate loss

As such, there is a conclusion:

“Being slightly behind (at half-time) significantly increases a team’s chance of winning” –D.Pink

Fans of LeSS Corner
A small group of Certified Scrum Trainers and Certified Enterprise-Team Coaches, supported the Large Scale Scrum (LeSS booth):  Fans of LeSS.

At least a few hundred people has come by the booth, asking for information about LeSS.
The booth servants received the following three biggest take-away points:

  • Unfortunately, still not too many people are aware of LeSS.  This is not to be confused with attempts or successes of adoption.  Rather, this is about general knowledge of what LeSS is. Ironically, the booth was labeled “Area 51” – the world’s best kept secret :).
  • Once being explained what LeSS is, how simple and common-sense it is, for many people, it has become an ‘AHA’ moment. The most awakening moment was understanding the difference between ‘global and local optimization’, ‘deep and narrow, as opposed to broad and shallow’, ‘owning vs. renting’.
  • Amazingly, how many people shared the same, almost standard complain/pain-point: “… we are currently using a very complicated, monolithic and cumbersome process (usually referring to some widely marketed XYZe framework), with multiple organizational layers involved,… and it creates lots of overhead, waste and friction,… practically nothing has changed in our workplace since the time we adopted it…same people, same duties and responsibilities (practically) BUT different terms, labels and roles … We really don’t like what we have to deal with now and our senior management is also frustrated but it seems that there is really nothing we can do to fix it at the moment…“.

“How to Stop Deterioration of Agile Coaching Quality: Organizationally, Industrially?” (my own presentation)

The goal of my presentation (Gene is here) was to discuss with the audience:

  • What is the problems’ origin [as it is derived from the title]?
  • Examples of the problem’s manifestation?
  • How can we solve the problem?

Throughout the course of my presentation I:

  • Exposed some classic systemic dysfunctions that sit upstream to the problem in scope.
  • Gave some examples of the problem, by using cartoons and satire
  • Delineated between the problem aspects, coming from outside organizations vs. siting on inside
  • Described types of internal (organizational) coaching structures that are to be avoided vs. tried
  • Gave some suggestions on what to avoid vs. what to look for in a good coach
  • Gave additional recommendations to companies, coaching-opportunity seekers and companies’ internal recruiters

“Download Presentation as PDF”


…and a some additional highlights from the gathering….
The Coaches Clinic – for 3 days
This traditional ‘free service’ by Scrum Alliance Enterprise and Team coaches and trainers what at the highest ever: 300 people were served in total,  over  course  of  3 consecutive days.


Certified Enterprise & Team Coaches and Scrum Trainers Retreat – Day 0:

This year brought together the biggest ever number of CECs-CTCs and CSTs.  One of the most important themes that was elaborated: how important it is for guide-level agile experts (CECs, CTCs, CSTs) to unite together in a joint effort to change the world of work.

Note: Thanks to Daniel Gullo (CST-CEC), who generously created for each attending Certified Enterprise Coach – colleague a memorable gift: Coach’s Coin with The Coach’s Creed:

  • CARITAS: Charity, giving back, helping others
  • COMMUNITAS: Fostering community and interaction
  • CONSILIARIUM: Counseling, consulting, The art of coaching
2020 Global Scrum Alliance Gathering is in NEW YORK(registration is not open yet)

May 15-17: Certified LeSS Practitioner Course & MeetUp with Craig Larman | NYC

Another mind-blowing and core-beliefs-challenging performance has been delivered by Craig Larman – the co-founder of Large Scale Scrum (LeSS).  This time, the class size has reached it’s record high (40 people), coming from various parts of the globe, representing different organizations, industries and cultures.  The walls of the biggest available, so far, training auditorium were completely (literally) covered with wizard paper, full of system modeling diagrams.

Some feedback and testimonies from Craig’ class, below:
“I wanted to thank Craig Larman for taking me through an amazing knowledge journey. If you work in a traditional organization and find yourself being frustrated and feeling like this is another ‘process of the month’ implementation and are constantly ask yourself WHY is this place like this, then this is the course for you. It’s a 3 day journey that spends a small amount of time on the mechanics on LeSS. And it’s the right and honest approach. If you want mechanics then read the book. As a coach, this course will give you the vision for organizational design for the next 50 years. This is the best money I have ever spent. Thanks again Craig and I promise I will read the three books 16 more times! PS… I’ve already read them once.”

Craig literally took all of us for deep freedive to the seabed of the agile paradigm. It’s refreshing to finally understand that agility, whether at scale or not, is explicitly about maximizing the organizational structure not added. Craig masterfully combines pragmatism with idealism, seasoned with an immense dose of experience and wit.
The class is basically a tour-de-force on systems thinking applied to software & hardware product development. One gets to clear the fog of local optimization in seemingly smart ideas such as component teams, team POs or specialized workers. The result is a simple, yet immensely challenging idea called LeSS. After the training one is ready to grasp just how big and necessary the chasm is to a better world of product development. I guess it’s up to each one of us to decide if we want to work on crossing that chasm, whatever it takes. Thanks Craig for helping me realize that!

Coming to Craig’s meet up is like a fireside chat. Very warm and very personal. The questions asked by the audience were incredibly thought-provoking and relatable even though they were from different functional domains. I personally liked the way Craig used examples from his vast experience to answer these questions. Once people get over the uneasiness coming from his comments, suggestions, and answers, I suspect they open their minds to many possibilities. There is something for everyone to learn, whether you are an entrepreneur, executive, manager or engineer. I look forward to seeing him again through this meet-up or another forum(s).

Anurag Saksena, Software Technology Lead


The training was wrapped with participation of Gordon Weir, invited by Craig Larman to share his past experience of LeSS adoption at Bank of America.

About Gordon: Gordon has been a department leader of technology groups in two large banks. And has first-hand experience of three LeSS huge adoptions (he doesn’t like the word “transformation”). All of them with very different contexts.  He talked about how he discovered LeSS and enabled it, and what he discovered during his multi year change journey. What didn’t work and gave personal anecdotes about how he dealt with the wider organisation’s persistent and unique ways of trying to force the org back to “normal”.


Additional Kodak moment are below:

2019 Big Apple Scrum Day Coaching Clinic – Highlights

2019 Big Apple Scrum Day (BASD) was an amazing experience for many – again!  The Coaches Clinic, supported by some top notch professionals in the industry, was one of the greatest hallmarks of the event – the tradition that has been maintained for the last 5 years.

Collectively, the coaches brought to the table lots of expertise, across multiple disciplines: organizational design, enterprise and team coaching, corporate culture, HR, business, DevOps/agile engineering, human psychology and other specialties.

Each coachee was given 15 minutes or more to share their thoughts, concerns or just ideas that required reflection and validation.  Throughout the daily course, the clinic has served about 35 people.

Below are some testimonies, coming directly from the coaches as well as some best Kodak moments:

Coaches’ Testimonies:

Zuzi Sochova, CST, Agile & Enterprise Coach:

“I had several conversations with people about their careers, about what is next, and it felt that the missing ingredients is a courage. The true agile value we all keep forgetting. The courage to brake the position structure and the prescribed career paths and create a brand new job for yourself. Don’t wait until someone opens a position. Design it yourself. Create a need for your skills and value you can deliver. Defined positions and career paths are over. They belong to the last century. In modern world the we need more emergent leadership, the flexible solution for an actual problem. And fixed roles only keeps status quo. You are a leader. Step out of your position box and create your own role, focused on value, allowing you to satisfy your dreams.”

Jim York, CEC-CTC, CST at FoxHedge:

“Another great turnout at the Coaches Clinic at this year’s Big Apple Scrum Day in New York City! My thanks to the attendees, sponsors, and organizers that make this one of the premier agile events on the east coast. This year marks the third year I’ve volunteered as a coach at the clinic. I had many good conversations with those who stopped by. If you were one of them, let me know how things turn out!”

Amitai Schleier, Agile and Development Coach at Latent Agility

“It was an honor to once again take part in the BASD Coaches Clinic. When people need advice or guidance for where or how to start improving technical practices, I’m happy to offer some — but only after I’ve asked enough questions to begin to understand where they’re coming from and what they’re up against. Fortunately, our 15-minute sessions are usually enough to find at least one insight, one recommendation, and one action. Yesterday’s Coaches Clinic was no exception. My appreciation to Gene and the BASD organizers for including me.”

Mary Thorn, Agile Practice Lead at Vaco:

“Coaching at the Big Apple Agile was an enjoyable experience. The attendees were educated in their questions and ready to be coached. They came curious with open ears. They left with possible solutions to help them in their day to day execution.”

Aleksandr Kizhner, Experienced Agile Coach at TEKSystems:

“Big Apple Scrum Day is a groovy place to meet people who share your passions and interests. It is a place, where you can meet your influencing people and heroes, a place – to share your ideas, learn something new and help others with your knowledge and experience.  One interesting thing that I remarked about how it felt: much more about actual practitioners of agile practices, rather than theorists or consultants. This was reflected in the attendees that I was inspired to meet, and I thank them all for sharing their interesting stories with me.
What was coming that might be game-changing in agile adoption 2019?”

David Liebman, Agile Coach at Eliassen

This was the fifth year that I have participated in BASD’s coaching clinic among a group of outstanding and dedicated professionals.  It is always a pleasure and an honor to be part of this group.  

The individuals who came for coaching continue to demonstrate a passion for Agile and the issues and concerns that they brought during this year’s clinic dealt with everything from how to facilitate Scrum events to differences in implementing various Agile frameworks.  

The most notable trend in my coaching sessions was the focus on applying soft skills to foster greater collaboration among the teams, stakeholders and executive management. This was expressed as the need to understand and level set expectations at all levels. It seems that although the basics of Agile practices seem to be better understood over the years the successful implementation of Agile remains an issue where this disconnect in understanding a major cause.  

I believe that as we continue to attempt to be Agile we are at a point where difficult conversations need to be had to ensure that we agree on what success means and what we need to do to be successful.  I am confident that we will reach our goals.”

Kodak Moments: