All posts by Gene

07/30 – LESS TALKS: Real life “war story” of LeSS adoption at Large Financial Institution – Continued

This was the second great presentation by Gordon Weir who delivered part-2 of his “Real life “war story” of LeSS adoption at Large Financial Institution” at NYC Large Scale Scrum (LeSS) meetup.

Please download Gordon’s Presentation (light on context, with very rich story behind)

This time, the event was made available globally, by using Nureva Span tool that allows to bring together distributed sites for real-time collaboration.  People from Canada and India have joined.  Zoom was added to capture in-class dynamics.

Participants were able to submit questions and comments for the speaker ahead of and during the session.   Canvas instance is captured ‘as is’ as well as transcribed below:

  Questions/Comments (about LeSS & Agile:

Transcribed Questions/Comments (about LeSS & Agile:

  • How did LeSS help financial org to stay lean and bring high impact and value to customers?
  • What involvement does HR have in LeSS adoption?
  • Will the speaker cover HR -related aspects of LeSS adoption?
  • What are some of the tricks you learned to break through the resistance to change?
  • How can we tell if our engineering practices are getting in the way of our success with LeSS?
  • What does LeSS recommend in terms of number of teams per Product Owner?
  • How product or value defined in Less?
  • Please, elaborate on Risk management with agile?
  • How to transform team divided by components into feature teams?
  • What will happen if any organization stops doing all the work except what is minimally essential?
  • As per Frederic Laloux, Teal is the color for agile.
    Ceremonies in Less
  • Attempting any sort of change in a financial institution is exhausting. How do we prevent burnout?
  • Most org’s/teams are not clear what their PRODUCT is – or agree on it!
  • Measurement, MBOs, Balanced Scorecards, OKRs, KPIs, lions, tigers, and bears.
  • Could you share practical ideas on changing status-quo mindsets of middle & first level mgrs?
  • Less Approach is a lot of work. Not for the faint of heart.
  • Are Agile transformations dependent on the right culture as a solid foundation?
  • Roles in Less compared to SAFe
  • Moving from SAFe to LeSS
  • Non-Violent (NVC) Friday discussion topics.
Transcribed Questions/Comments Nureva Span

Many questions about Nureva Span can be answered by visiting this page, where its technical documentation is listed.  The tool has been used for LeSS meetups and various agile events for some time.  For more information, please inquire directly by submitting a question at the bottom of this page.

More Kodak Moments:

 

Guidelines to hiring a professional Coach

Let’s face it, today, finding an experienced and credible agile coach, is not easy.  If you disagree with this statement, you are either very lucky and have special access to some great talent (e.g. referrals or networking) OR your perception of the role may need to change.
There is no need to be ashamed of not being able to find a good coach. You are not alone, many companies face the same challenge.
Truth be told, unfortunately, the industry has changed significantly  of the last few years and became the source of many problems (some very classic problems are described here).  Today, the term “Senior Agile Coach” has been grossly diluted. 🙁
But fortunately, there are still great standards and guidelines you can follow, when looking for an agile coach, irrespective of industry trends.  Please, consider the dimensions below, when looking for a professional agile coach, for your organization.  The original sources of these requirements are listed at the bottom of this page and you are encouraged to explore them for additional details.
Please, do not reduce, simplify or trivialize some of the key expectations of a professional agile coach.  Because, if you do, the following two problems will follow:
  • Industry coaching quality (average) will be further decreased,… and even if you don’t care about this fact as much…you will care about the next fact….
  • Quality of service to your own organization will be also low

…with that….


“Must-Have” for Professional Agile Coach

Quantitative Assets:
  • Has significant hands-on experience in at least one of the roles on a Scrum Team
  • Has coached multiple organizations, departments, or programs
  • Has, at least, 1000 hours of experience coaching at the enterprise/organizational level or a combination of enterprise and multi-team level coaching
  • Has diversity of coaching experiences that can be demonstrated, using different client engagement examples, and which include experience at the organizational level
Demonstration of deep knowledge:
  • Has formal and informal education about coaching and strong mentor relationships
  • Has good working knowledge of Agile and Lean values, principles, and practices.
  • Has helped individuals, teams, and leadership to understand and apply Agile and Lean values, principles, and practices effectively
  • Understands the dynamics, patterns, and development of multi-level teams and how they interact at the organizational level
  • Knows the difference between consulting and coaching and knows when to apply each.
Ability to clearly articulate and substantiate one’s own:
  • Coaching Career Overview (coaching, agile history and how a person got where he/she is today. Include key milestone years)
  • Coaching Focus (summary of a person’s professional self today, including a coaching approach and/or philosophy to coaching)
  • Coaching Goals (personal development goals in coaching)
  • Formal Coaching Education (formal education activities which have contributed significantly to your coaching journey. This includes a wide range of courses on topics including facilitation, leadership, consulting, coaching, process, tools, techniques, frameworks, and other related activities which have influenced our coaching practice)
  • Formal Mentor-ship Education (coach mentor-ship and significant collaboration activities where a person has DEVELOPED a skill or technique or RECEIVED guidance to his/her coaching approach and mindset.)
  • Informal Coaching Learning (significant topics you have studied outside of the Scrum literature which has impacted his/her coaching approach or coaching philosophy)
  • Agile Community Participation (agile community events, such as user groups, gatherings, retreats, camps, conferences, etc. in which a coach has participated)
  • Agile Community Leadership (leadership contributions to the agile community (e.g. writing, publishing, presenting, facilitating, organizing, training and other activities) through events, publications, courses, blogs and forums)
  • Agile Community Collaborative Mentoring & Advisory (significant collaborative agile mentoring, advisory activities, where a person was mentoring, advising other individuals to increase their competency or in development of a specific goal)
  • Coaching Tools, Techniques or Frameworks known (coaching tools, techniques or frameworks which you have implemented, customized, co-developed or developed in one or more client engagements)
Skills, Tools & Techniques:
  • Has contributed to significant improvements in organizations or departments through coaching techniques
  • Has helped organizations and teams beyond the basics of Scrum theory and practice
  • Has enabled organizations to find their own solutions to business problems through the application of Agile principles
  • Is familiar with, promotes and embodies the mindset of Servant Leadership
  • Uses a rich set of facilitation, training and coaching tools, and models
Personal Qualities:
  • Coaching Mindset Coaching skills/practices and frameworks
  • Evidence that the coach has taken both their Experience and Learning and synthesized these into definitive practices, frameworks, approaches, and strategies)
  • Self-awareness: Able to reflect on their own contribution to the coaching by virtue of their own ‘being’
  • Constant Learning: Has and continues to acquire Coaching oriented learning through multiple dimensions
  • Diversity of Experience with different types & sizes of organizations
  • Participation in the Agile community

Note: Your company needs to have internal expertise to validate a person, based on the above.


Resources:

Why Is LeSS Authentic? Why Should Leadership NOT Exempt Itself from Learning LeSS?

Large Scale Scrum (LeSS) is the agile framework that has a history of implementations, trials & errors, experiments and experience reports collected and documented throughout a decade.
LeSS is Scrum, performed by multiple teams (2-8) that work on the same widely defined product, for the same Product Owner.
LeSS stresses the importance of organizational descaling (a.k.a. flattening) that needs to happen before agility can be scaled.  The first LeSS book (out of three published so far) was written in 2008 and it had incorporated the ideas of its two authors, C. Larman and B. Vodde, by mainly including their own experiences of initial LeSS adoptions, from years before.
Overall, LeSS journey has begun many years before Large Scale Scrum has been officially presented to the world and recognized, as a framework, and this is important to acknowledge.  But why?    

Because LeSS, unlike some other very popular and commercially successful frameworks, that are very easy to ‘unwrap and install’, was not invented re-actively, as a “quick fix/hot patch”, in response to growing market trends and business needs (commercial driver).

LeSS is authentic.  LeSS took its time to mature and cultivate, as a philosophy and way of thinking, not as a revenue-generating utility.  LeSS did it at its own pace, without a rush, while incorporating learning of many coaches and companies that went through LeSS adoptions, over years.   LeSS has naturally “aged”, in a good sense of this word 😊.

Important Point: Whereas, deep learning of system dynamics and organizational design is equally available to everyone who attends LeSS training, not everyone can equally impact-fully apply this learning, when they go back to work.  But why?

Lots of LeSS learning (through system modelling, using causal loop diagrams) touches upon organizational elements, such as HR norms and policies, reporting structures, career paths and promotions, location/site strategies, budgeting/finance processes, etc. – things that are considered to be “untouchable” for an average person (employee).

Of course, it does not mean that an average person is not able to start seeing things differently (they definitely do!) after studying LeSS but it is just that he may not have enough power/influence to make necessary organizational changes that are required by LeSS.  In fact, for many people, this newly gained knowledge which is no longer possible to “unlearn” 😊 (e.g. ability think systemically), is accompanied by realization of one’s own powerlessness – and could be pretty frustrating.

Things are different for people that occupy higher organizational positions.  A senior leader is able to combine the decision-making power that is given to him by his organization and the power of newly obtained knowledge, coming from LeSS training.  These two powers, united, can have an amplified effect.

Notably, a senior leader who wants to apply LeSS learning to improve his organization must have something else that is very special, in addition to just having general curiosity of the subject and desire to experiment: it is called a ‘sense of urgency’.  The best examples of senior leaders that have learned LeSS and then applied learning to reality, came from situations, where the need to change was urgent and separated success from failure.  Then, if the above is true, the formula of LeSS adoption success becomes:

(Organizational Power + Power of Knowledge)  x Sense of Urgency = Success of LeSS adoption

Important Point: It is strongly not advisable for senior leaders to delegate LeSS learning to people that are below them organizationally and therefore, not empowered to make organizational changes. Granted, individuals at all organizational levels will be benefited from learning LeSS (it is a great eye opener).  But senior leaders – people that are empowered to make significant organizational changes, must attend LeSS training in person and not delegate attendance to their subordinates.  Leadership should not exempt itself from learning.
In fact, and ideally, senior leadership should attend LeSS training, accompanied by their respective organizational verticals, so that everyone goes through the same learning journey together.  Having HR and finance people, alongside with C-level executives and staff members of lower organizational levels – is a HUGE BONUS.

Not All Scrum Anti-Patterns Are Easily Identifiable

This is not true Scrum!!!” – we often hear from people, pointing at omissions and pitfalls of fake Scrum implementations.  The list of classically seen Scrum anti-pattern could become pretty exhaustive.  Here are some examples of  “Dark Scrum” (as Ron Jeffries puts it):

  • Multiple people playing the role of Product Owner
  • No Scrum Master present or line manager performing the role
  • Scrum events are dismissed, in favor of status calls
  • PMO or first-line managers driving team dynamics , assign and monitor team work
  • Teams are understaffed and miss required skill-set to complete work
  • Too many translators-BAs that sit between real customers and development teams (see below)

But not all Scrum anti-patterns are equally obvious.  Let’s take a look at three instances of team-sprinting, where (1) Scrum anti-pattern is obvious, (2) Scrum anti-pattern is not obvious, (3) Scrum is done well.

Just before we proceed, let’s recap (paraphrase) what the Scrum Guide says: In Scrum, in every Sprint, a team delivers Potentially Shippable Product Increment (PSPI).  This is fundamental for Scrum.  In order for this to happen, each team must possess all necessary attributes (skills, knowledge, domain expertise) required to get work fully DONE (potentially shippable). This is what makes Scrum - real Scrum. Many teams that lack the required Scrum attributes still attempt to sprint, however, effectiveness of such “sprint-like activities” is significantly reduced.  Not all anti-patterns of Scrum are equally obvious.
Instance 1: Scrum anti-pattern is obvious
  • Separate, phase-specific backlogs or
  • Single backlog with phase-specific items
  • Local optimization by single-skill specialists (e.g. PM, BA, QA, Architect, Developer)
  • Hand-overs, toll-gates, “internal contracts”
  • Long periods of down-time by specialists, when it is not “their phase” to work
  • “Water-scrum” /” Scrum-fall”
  • Very weak Definition of Ready & Done
  • PSPI – takes many sprints to produce
Instance 2: Scrum anti-pattern is not obvious
  • Separate, component-specific backlogs or
  • Single backlog with component-specific items
  • Local optimization by component specialists (e.g. UI/UX, middle-tier, back-end, web service, architecture)
  • Hand-overs, toll-gates, “internal contracts”
  • Multiple non-development sprints needed to integrate all components and fix bugs
  • Weak Definition of Ready & Done
  • PSPI – takes many sprints to produce
Instance 3: Scrum is done well.
  • Single, shared, customer-centric backlog
  • Single, empowered Product Owner
  • Shared ownership of work, no siloes
  • Swarming by T-shaped people
  • Strong Definition of Ready & Done
  • PSPI – every sprint

For organizations and teams that are new to agile and scrum, did not make a required investment in proper training/education, have not made an effort to improve organizational design for better agility and do not have experienced agile coaches, supporting them in their journey, option 2 above, may seem as “OK way to sprint”.  But please, beware, that you are not getting a real benefit of true Scrum, when you have so much “Undone” work at the end of each sprint cycle ☹.

Below is a graphic illustration of the three types of sprinting described.

 

06/13 – LESS TALKS: Real life “war story” of LeSS adoption at Large Financial Institution

On June 13, Gordon Weir delivered his great presentation “Real life “war story” of LeSS adoption at Large Financial Institution” at NYC Large Scale Scrum (LeSS) meetup.

Here are some of the key points made in the presentation:

  • In 2006, there was a decision made to stop using the concept of a ‘project’, as this fake and artificially fabricated term implied start and end of something that was meant to be continuous: product development.
  • In 2007, there was a decision made to stop using Component-centric work and Release Trains – something that was mistakenly introduced by SAFe implementation
  • During 2006-2008 – the number of ‘feature points’ (equivalent to deployed features) delivered each sprint was pretty low. Introduction of SAFe did not improve the situation: too much ‘undone’ component-work remained at the end of each sprint
  • Between 2008 and 2009, Large Scale Scrum (LeSS) was introduced, and it led to a number of ‘feature points’ increasing steeply, every sprint
  • Closer to 2009, when 150+ development teams introduced SBE (specification by example), ATTD (acceptance test-driven development) and feature toggling (engineering practices that are strongly advocated by LeSS), a number of ‘feature points’ delivered each sprint grew even higher, with many teams becoming capable of releasing to production multiple times each sprint
  • Forming properly structured feature teams in NY, London, Kiev, Hyderabad and Hong Kong brought about the following benefits:
    • Reduced hand-offs: “concurrent engineering”
    • Clear accountability for feature delivery (by each team)
    • Code base sharing, across all teams that resulted in greater quality, evidenced by very minor issues, following latest release
    • Each team, focusing on one feature at a time – something that led to shared purpose and reduced task switching (ultimately leading to greater efficiency)
    • Teams, having greater appreciation for customer needs

Why did everything work? Because there was an environment of Autonomy, Fearlessness and good practices of software Engineering created.

Many companies start agile adoptions by introducing a long array of “agile processes” and “best practices”, falsely assuming that they are all universal or absolute.  But they are not.  Every company, every department, every situation has its own context.  Also, starting with “best practices” concept is wrong because hardly any of them are always “best”; rather “great” and only contextually.  Instead companies should start with introducing good principles that can be over time developed into good processes and practices that will always remain contextual.

The magic formula then becomes: Process + Practices = Principles + Context

Download Gordon Weir’s Presentation

May 19-22: Global Scrum Alliance Gathering | AUS-TX

An amazing 2019 Global Scrum Alliance Gathering (May 19-22), organized by SA staff that brought together a record-high number of professionals from around the globe and had countless amazing events – too many to describe them all in one newsletter. 🙂
Here, I would like to  recap what committed to my memory the most:
  • Keynote presentation by Daniel Pink
  • My personal experience from servicing the ‘Fans of LeSS’ booth, attended by hundreds of people
  • Highlights of my own presentation that draw more than 100 people: “How to Stop Deterioration of Coaching Quality: Industrially and Organizationally” and feedback from the room
  • Coaches Clinic and Coaches/Trainers Retreat highlights 

Keynote Presentation by Daniel H. Pink

During his keynote presentation, Daniel H. Pink (the best-selling author, contributing editor and co-executive producer, known world-wide) shared the highlights of his new book: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing.

Pink’s Synopsis: “We all know that timing is everything. Trouble is, we don’t know much about timing itself. Our business and professional lives present a never-ending stream of ‘when’ decisions. But we make them based on intuition and guesswork. Timing, we believe, is an art.  But timing is a really a science – one we can use to make smarter decisions, enhance our productivity, and boost the performance of our organizations.

Some highlights from Pink’s talk:

Scientifically and statistically, both humans and apes, have the lowest well-being at mid-life.

Therefore, D.Pink’s recommendation on how to deal with such unpleasant mid-points, are as follows:

  • Beware [of such mid-points]
  • Use midpoints to wake up rather than roll over
  • Imagine you’re a little behind

Then, D. Pink also stressed that there are hidden patterns of how time-of-day affects our analytic and creative capabilities – and how simple work rearrangements can improve our effectiveness. For example, when a person makes an appointment to a physician, it is best to ask for a morning time slot, instead of afternoon slot, since physicians tend to have more analytical capabilities before lunch.

D. Pink’s next point was that as individuals get older, at the end of each decade, they are more prone to take certain actions that psychologically make them feel younger. As an example, he used statistical data of marathon runners: people are most likely to run their first marathon at the ages that are just at the brink of next decade: e.g. 29 or 49 years old.

“Because the approach of a new decade… functions as a marker of progress through the life span…people are more apt to evaluate their lives as a chronological decade ends, than they are at other times.”- Daniel H. Pink
How about psychological reaction to the fact that something will be GONE and the time when it will happen is coming up shortly?

In one case study (left image), when a person was given one chocolate candy at a time, and was asked to give feedback about its taste, a response was usually consistent, for each subsequent candy. However, as soon as a person was told that it was the last candy to taste, feedback about how a candy tasted became significantly more positive.

In another case study (right image), when a group of people was asked to fill out a survey, in order to receive a certificate, before it expired, responses were different, when conditions were set as “will expire in 3 weeks” vs. “will expire in two months”.  Apparently, proximity of expiration date made people much more responsive to the request to fill out a survey.

D.Pink’s next point was about how half-time checks can shape our behavior and impact final results. According to D. Pink, scientists and researchers really like statistical data from sports because it is ‘clean’.  Here, using an example of basketball teams, when teams play a game, the following can be observed, depending on half-time results:

  • Being significantly behind – usually results in a loss
  • Being significantly ahead – usually results in a victory
  • Being slightly behind – motivates people to step up and put an extra effort, which results ultimate victory
  • Being slightly ahead – makes people relaxed, less focused and less persuasive, which results in ultimate loss

As such, there is a conclusion:

“Being slightly behind (at half-time) significantly increases a team’s chance of winning” –D.Pink

Fans of LeSS Corner
A small group of Certified Scrum Trainers and Certified Enterprise-Team Coaches, supported the Large Scale Scrum (LeSS booth):  Fans of LeSS.

At least a few hundred people has come by the booth, asking for information about LeSS.
The booth servants received the following three biggest take-away points:

  • Unfortunately, still not too many people are aware of LeSS.  This is not to be confused with attempts or successes of adoption.  Rather, this is about general knowledge of what LeSS is. Ironically, the booth was labeled “Area 51” – the world’s best kept secret :).
  • Once being explained what LeSS is, how simple and common-sense it is, for many people, it has become an ‘AHA’ moment. The most awakening moment was understanding the difference between ‘global and local optimization’, ‘deep and narrow, as opposed to broad and shallow’, ‘owning vs. renting’.
  • Amazingly, how many people shared the same, almost standard complain/pain-point: “… we are currently using a very complicated, monolithic and cumbersome process (usually referring to some widely marketed XYZe framework), with multiple organizational layers involved,… and it creates lots of overhead, waste and friction,… practically nothing has changed in our workplace since the time we adopted it…same people, same duties and responsibilities (practically) BUT different terms, labels and roles … We really don’t like what we have to deal with now and our senior management is also frustrated but it seems that there is really nothing we can do to fix it at the moment…“.

“How to Stop Deterioration of Agile Coaching Quality: Organizationally, Industrially?” (my own presentation)

The goal of my presentation (Gene is here) was to discuss with the audience:

  • What is the problems’ origin [as it is derived from the title]?
  • Examples of the problem’s manifestation?
  • How can we solve the problem?

Throughout the course of my presentation I:

  • Exposed some classic systemic dysfunctions that sit upstream to the problem in scope.
  • Gave some examples of the problem, by using cartoons and satire
  • Delineated between the problem aspects, coming from outside organizations vs. siting on inside
  • Described types of internal (organizational) coaching structures that are to be avoided vs. tried
  • Gave some suggestions on what to avoid vs. what to look for in a good coach
  • Gave additional recommendations to companies, coaching-opportunity seekers and companies’ internal recruiters

“Download Presentation as PDF”


…and a some additional highlights from the gathering….
The Coaches Clinic – for 3 days
This traditional ‘free service’ by Scrum Alliance Enterprise and Team coaches and trainers what at the highest ever: 300 people were served in total,  over  course  of  3 consecutive days.


Certified Enterprise & Team Coaches and Scrum Trainers Retreat – Day 0:

This year brought together the biggest ever number of CECs-CTCs and CSTs.  One of the most important themes that was elaborated: how important it is for guide-level agile experts (CECs, CTCs, CSTs) to unite together in a joint effort to change the world of work.

Note: Thanks to Daniel Gullo (CST-CEC), who generously created for each attending Certified Enterprise Coach – colleague a memorable gift: Coach’s Coin with The Coach’s Creed:

  • CARITAS: Charity, giving back, helping others
  • COMMUNITAS: Fostering community and interaction
  • CONSILIARIUM: Counseling, consulting, The art of coaching
2020 Global Scrum Alliance Gathering is in NEW YORK(registration is not open yet)

May 15-17: Certified LeSS Practitioner Course & MeetUp with Craig Larman | NYC

Another mind-blowing and core-beliefs-challenging performance has been delivered by Craig Larman – the co-founder of Large Scale Scrum (LeSS).  This time, the class size has reached it’s record high (40 people), coming from various parts of the globe, representing different organizations, industries and cultures.  The walls of the biggest available, so far, training auditorium were completely (literally) covered with wizard paper, full of system modeling diagrams.

Some feedback and testimonies from Craig’ class, below:
“I wanted to thank Craig Larman for taking me through an amazing knowledge journey. If you work in a traditional organization and find yourself being frustrated and feeling like this is another ‘process of the month’ implementation and are constantly ask yourself WHY is this place like this, then this is the course for you. It’s a 3 day journey that spends a small amount of time on the mechanics on LeSS. And it’s the right and honest approach. If you want mechanics then read the book. As a coach, this course will give you the vision for organizational design for the next 50 years. This is the best money I have ever spent. Thanks again Craig and I promise I will read the three books 16 more times! PS… I’ve already read them once.”

Craig literally took all of us for deep freedive to the seabed of the agile paradigm. It’s refreshing to finally understand that agility, whether at scale or not, is explicitly about maximizing the organizational structure not added. Craig masterfully combines pragmatism with idealism, seasoned with an immense dose of experience and wit.
The class is basically a tour-de-force on systems thinking applied to software & hardware product development. One gets to clear the fog of local optimization in seemingly smart ideas such as component teams, team POs or specialized workers. The result is a simple, yet immensely challenging idea called LeSS. After the training one is ready to grasp just how big and necessary the chasm is to a better world of product development. I guess it’s up to each one of us to decide if we want to work on crossing that chasm, whatever it takes. Thanks Craig for helping me realize that!

Coming to Craig’s meet up is like a fireside chat. Very warm and very personal. The questions asked by the audience were incredibly thought-provoking and relatable even though they were from different functional domains. I personally liked the way Craig used examples from his vast experience to answer these questions. Once people get over the uneasiness coming from his comments, suggestions, and answers, I suspect they open their minds to many possibilities. There is something for everyone to learn, whether you are an entrepreneur, executive, manager or engineer. I look forward to seeing him again through this meet-up or another forum(s).

Anurag Saksena, Software Technology Lead


The training was wrapped with participation of Gordon Weir, invited by Craig Larman to share his past experience of LeSS adoption at Bank of America.

About Gordon: Gordon has been a department leader of technology groups in two large banks. And has first-hand experience of three LeSS huge adoptions (he doesn’t like the word “transformation”). All of them with very different contexts.  He talked about how he discovered LeSS and enabled it, and what he discovered during his multi year change journey. What didn’t work and gave personal anecdotes about how he dealt with the wider organisation’s persistent and unique ways of trying to force the org back to “normal”.


Additional Kodak moment are below:

2019 Big Apple Scrum Day Coaching Clinic – Highlights

2019 Big Apple Scrum Day (BASD) was an amazing experience for many – again!  The Coaches Clinic, supported by some top notch professionals in the industry, was one of the greatest hallmarks of the event – the tradition that has been maintained for the last 5 years.

Collectively, the coaches brought to the table lots of expertise, across multiple disciplines: organizational design, enterprise and team coaching, corporate culture, HR, business, DevOps/agile engineering, human psychology and other specialties.

Each coachee was given 15 minutes or more to share their thoughts, concerns or just ideas that required reflection and validation.  Throughout the daily course, the clinic has served about 35 people.

Below are some testimonies, coming directly from the coaches as well as some best Kodak moments:

Coaches’ Testimonies:

Zuzi Sochova, CST, Agile & Enterprise Coach:

“I had several conversations with people about their careers, about what is next, and it felt that the missing ingredients is a courage. The true agile value we all keep forgetting. The courage to brake the position structure and the prescribed career paths and create a brand new job for yourself. Don’t wait until someone opens a position. Design it yourself. Create a need for your skills and value you can deliver. Defined positions and career paths are over. They belong to the last century. In modern world the we need more emergent leadership, the flexible solution for an actual problem. And fixed roles only keeps status quo. You are a leader. Step out of your position box and create your own role, focused on value, allowing you to satisfy your dreams.”

Jim York, CEC-CTC, CST at FoxHedge:

“Another great turnout at the Coaches Clinic at this year’s Big Apple Scrum Day in New York City! My thanks to the attendees, sponsors, and organizers that make this one of the premier agile events on the east coast. This year marks the third year I’ve volunteered as a coach at the clinic. I had many good conversations with those who stopped by. If you were one of them, let me know how things turn out!”

Amitai Schleier, Agile and Development Coach at Latent Agility

“It was an honor to once again take part in the BASD Coaches Clinic. When people need advice or guidance for where or how to start improving technical practices, I’m happy to offer some — but only after I’ve asked enough questions to begin to understand where they’re coming from and what they’re up against. Fortunately, our 15-minute sessions are usually enough to find at least one insight, one recommendation, and one action. Yesterday’s Coaches Clinic was no exception. My appreciation to Gene and the BASD organizers for including me.”

Mary Thorn, Agile Practice Lead at Vaco:

“Coaching at the Big Apple Agile was an enjoyable experience. The attendees were educated in their questions and ready to be coached. They came curious with open ears. They left with possible solutions to help them in their day to day execution.”

Aleksandr Kizhner, Experienced Agile Coach at TEKSystems:

“Big Apple Scrum Day is a groovy place to meet people who share your passions and interests. It is a place, where you can meet your influencing people and heroes, a place – to share your ideas, learn something new and help others with your knowledge and experience.  One interesting thing that I remarked about how it felt: much more about actual practitioners of agile practices, rather than theorists or consultants. This was reflected in the attendees that I was inspired to meet, and I thank them all for sharing their interesting stories with me.
What was coming that might be game-changing in agile adoption 2019?”

David Liebman, Agile Coach at Eliassen

This was the fifth year that I have participated in BASD’s coaching clinic among a group of outstanding and dedicated professionals.  It is always a pleasure and an honor to be part of this group.  

The individuals who came for coaching continue to demonstrate a passion for Agile and the issues and concerns that they brought during this year’s clinic dealt with everything from how to facilitate Scrum events to differences in implementing various Agile frameworks.  

The most notable trend in my coaching sessions was the focus on applying soft skills to foster greater collaboration among the teams, stakeholders and executive management. This was expressed as the need to understand and level set expectations at all levels. It seems that although the basics of Agile practices seem to be better understood over the years the successful implementation of Agile remains an issue where this disconnect in understanding a major cause.  

I believe that as we continue to attempt to be Agile we are at a point where difficult conversations need to be had to ensure that we agree on what success means and what we need to do to be successful.  I am confident that we will reach our goals.”

Kodak Moments:

2019 BIG APPLE SCRUM DAY: COACHING CLINIC (COACHES WORKSHEET)


This page is being gradually developed towards May, 2019 Big Apple Scrum Day Coaching Clinic.

For similar past events please visit:

Below are some basic guidelines for participating coaches on how to run a coaching clinic during Big Apple Scrum Day.  Experience and working models of previous clinics (Scrum Alliance, Agile Alliance) have being used. If you have other recommendations or additional ideas, please suggest 🙂  .

General Coaching Guidelines:

  • Wear a coaching hat – we shall try to get some from Scrum Alliance folks (their ‘station’ should near the clinic)
  • Walk-ins are OK if we have capacity
  • Each session is limited to 15 min, unless there is no line – then you can attend to another person
  • Appointments get priority over walk-ins
  • It is OK to offer a business  card for future consultation but Do NOT sell services or proactively solicit business, while coaching
  • Paired coaching is OK if we have capacity (one coach works, another observes; then– debrief).
  • Always, start off with understanding what brought a person to the clinic (e.g. “What brought you here?” or “How I can help?”)
  • We can briefly retrospect at the end of the day or, if not possible, later via email

Participating Coaches (BOARD view):

This is us – the clinicians:

Coach’s Name Home base
 Gene Gendel  New York, USA
Mary Thorn Raleigh, NC
David Liebman New York, USA
Faye Thompson Hilliard, OH
Skylar Watson Des Moines, IA.
Jim York  Leesburg, VA
Alexandr Kizhner   New York, USA
Amitai Schleier  New York, USA
Ben Scott Richmond VA
Ross Hughes  Burlington, Vermont
Dustin Thostenson Des Moines, IA.

 

Coaches’ Availability (BOARD view):

In the morning, we shall put up a board in our working area.  On this board, each coach will put his name (on a sticky), in a time slot when he/she is willing/able to offer service.  Example below:

Time Slot Available Coach
8:00 – 8:30
8:30 – 9:00
9:00 – 9:30
9:30 – 10:00
10:00 – 10:30
10:30 – 11:00
11:00 – 11:30
11:30 – 12:00
12:00 – 12:30
12:30 – 1:00
1:00 – 1:30
1:30 – 2:00
2:00 – 2:30
2:30 – 3:00
3:00 – 3:30
3:30 – 4:00
4:00 – 4:30
4:30 – 5:00

Note: Time slots should correlate to the Event’s Main Schedule

 

Appointment Schedule (BOARD view):

On this board, each attendee will put his/her name/discussion topic (on a sticky), into a time slot when they are planning to attend the clinic.  Attendees may request multiple time slots, within reasonable limits. Each request  = one sticky note.  Example:

15-min Time Slot During

Attendee Name/Discussion Topic

Registration
Morning Session Part 1
Morning Break
Morning Session Part 2
Lunch Break
Afternoon Session Part 1
Afternoon Break
Afternoon Session Part 2

Note: Time slots should correlate to the Event’s Main Schedule 

BOARD: Coachee’s Response:

On this board, every clinic attendee  will be asked to write a brief feedback on a sticky note (example from Orlando). They may or may not provide the name of a coach that offered assistance – it is up to them.   We, the coaches, don’t have to watch them doing this.  Once we are done with a coaching session, they can self-manage.

BOARD: Appointment Counter

On this board, we shall be collecting all sticky notes that were served. Attendees will be asked to post them there, after they attended the clinic.