Category Archives: Kanban

About Contracts That Support Agile Ways of Working



One of various under-served (ignored) dimensions of agile transformations that frequently limit an organization’s success, there is one that requires special attention.

It is vendor management that can be traced back to legal contracts between a client company and supplier/vendor.

Vendor management norms and guidelines define relationships and interaction between a company’s own employees and external workers, individually and in team-level settings.  Unfortunately, this issue is not always obvious and therefore, is neither explicitly raised by inexperienced agile coaches, nor adequately addressed by senior leadership that is satisfied with limited results (could be also a sign of complacency).

There is a lot of improvement required in how corporate attorneys and vendor managers define, initiate and maintain external relationships with third parties.

This post provides a short summary of recommended improvements – they are  listed below.  It is based on a more comprehensive excerpt: Agile Contracts Primer, by T. Arbogast, C. Larman, B. Vodde.

(Also, please refer to Top-5 high-level recommendations for what to look for in vendors, selected for agile projects, in “Survival List to Vendor Selection on Agile Projects”)

Recommendations for Attorneys and Vendor Managers:
  • Acknowledge that Legal, just like Finance and HR can diminish project success if not considered as a part of agile ecosystem
  • Get rid of false dichotomies around the 3rd Agile Manifesto value: “just because we value customer collaboration than contract negotiation, it does not mean that a contract has no value” 😉
  • Make sure that attorneys understand that a “successful contract” is not the main goal.  It is a successful project or product (delivery) that is the main goal.
  • Draw analogy between software project complexity and your own (if you are an attorney) legal work complexity, to appreciate how difficult it is to do precise upfront estimation on huge, unpredictable body of work
  • Understand how agile approaches can lower (not completely remove) friction around, such areas of contract negotiation as liability, warranty, payments, pricing, deliverable
  • Understand that external legal contracts have downstream impact on internal non-legal contracts – relationships between people
  • Understand repercussions of subjective incentives and rewards (bonuses), given to attorneys for legal outcomes (event if they are successful), instead of focusing on an overall project success
  • Understand/study agile and iterative development (e.g. Scrum, Kanban), system thinking concepts, lean principles and agile project assumptions differ from traditional project assumptions
  • Gain strong grasp of what Acceptance Criteria, Definition of Done, PSPI and MVP mean
  • Study how continuous deployment and incremental development can reduce risk and exposure, as oppose to sequential/waterfall SDLC that usually  increases it
  • Understand positive implications of agile ways of working Limited Liability and Warranty, Deliverable and Pricing
  • Specifically, with regards to Pricing, understand:
    • Variations of T&M contracts and why they are good for agile projects.  For example:
      • Fixed price per iteration (per unit of time), fixed-price per large project
      • Fixed price per unit of work
      • Pay-per-use models
      • Hybrid shared pain/gain models
      • Capped-Price, Variable-Scope vs. Capped-Price, Partial-Fixed-Scope vs. Fixed-Price, Variable-Scope
      • Target-cost
    • Reasons why FPFS contacts are least desirable/most risky and what are some of the ways of lowering such risks
    • Difference between flexible scope without and with penalty (shared gain/pain)
    • Early termination – does not mean failure
Conclusion

Contracts are not necessarily always bad.  Having an external, legal contract between a client and a vendor/service provider/supplier is perfectly normal and even necessary.  It is the form of a contract that matters, as it has downstream effect on dynamics and behaviors between people within a client company, as well as between the parties.

To produce a meaningful contract for an agile project, an attorney should have good understanding of what is valued most in agile work, by agile teams, and optimize his/her own work for the benefit of an overall project, not just for having an amazing contract (locally optimized for an attorney’s benefit).  To gain such understanding a legal professional needs to invest significantly in studying principles of agile/adaptive product development (e.g. Scrum, Kanban), lean and system thinking.

Some of the above listed contract types are more supportive of agile work than others and each once must be explored in detail for suitability, depending on unique organizational settings.

 

Thoughts by Rick Waters, CST

Rick Waters is a Business Agility Coach and Trainer, from Chicago, with more than 15 years of technical software development experience, and almost 10 years of Agile leadership experience.  Rick primarily trains Scrum, Enterprise Scrum Business Agility, and Kanban.
This is what Rick wrote, in support of the recently released book by Gene Gendel (Adaptive Ecosystems: The Green Book: Collection of Independent Essays About Agility):

Nearly every time we talked, my dear friend, Mike Beedle (RIP), would challenge me to think deeper about less conventional concepts that I wouldn’t normally consider having an impact on the subject matter we were discussing.  Often, Mike would come back to Employee Experience.

“Employee Experience,” he would say “is the where we need to focus in order to truly give our customers the amazing experience that we want them to have with us, as a company, and our products.”

Recently, the well-meaning practices of installing ping-pong and foosball tables, or game rooms, or a kegerator in the lunchroom, have come under fire.  Though these ‘perks’ to working in a space where at least someone is focusing on an aspect of Employee Experience (EX) seem great on the surface (mainly to new employees during the interview process), they don’t speak to the long-term EX.  They speak, mostly, to something I like to call Short-term Employee Gratification.

I want to reiterate, the people responsible for work-place ‘improvements’ like those already mentioned, are well-meaning.  But, like many good deeds, they don’t go unpunished.  Here, mostly because these Short-term Employee Gratification efforts are just that – short-term.

Long-term EX is about sustainability.  We see, in the Principles behind the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, that there has always been someone concerned with sustainability.

“Agile processes promote sustainable development.
The sponsors, developers, and users should be able
to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.”

So, why do even the best of us not understand that our actions are not having the intended effects?  Because we are HUMAN BEINGS, and we have this natural tendency to believe that when we ‘fix’ something, that it stays ‘fixed’.  In this case, when we make our employees happy, they should stay happy.

So, why don’t employees stay happy?  Because they are HUMAN BEINGS, and trying to get a human being to stay happy when nothing around them is improving, the morale suffers.

We talk a lot, in the Agile world, about the concept of Continual Improvement.  We also warn those whom we mentor, to only take on as much change as they can handle at any given time.  Trying to change too many things at once and realize which of those changes actually had a positive effect can be darn near impossible at times.

So, in this example, maybe just provide one perk at a time.  But, in all fairness, slowly rolling out toys for employees to play with at work … that’s still just a stop-gap measure to gratification, not a solution to improving the Employee Experience.

I now invite you to take a trip down memory lane with me.  The year was 2004.  I was working at a young company in Chicago, still relatively small at 100-125 employees.  We had a culture of freedom, not fear.  That would come later.  Our products were platforms and API’s for electronic traders (of stocks, bonds, future, options, etc.) to make trades quickly, setup their own custom automatic trading rules, and develop custom trade strategies.

Life was great!  For a while.  There were monthly bonuses for everyone, when the Sales department hit their quota.  There were free donuts and bagels once a week.  I believe that, for a time, there were even free soft drinks from the vending machines.  Our team even had full autonomy over who we interviewed, and who we hired.

As the company grew, and we grew quickly, these perks slowly disappeared.  Every one of them.  Until if we asked around, “Hey, do you remember when we used to have <perk>?”  The general answer was likely “That was before my time.”  But, in reality, it likely wasn’t before their time, they just didn’t remember it.

Let’s fast forward a bit through the ugly parts – fast growth in head count, demanding deadlines and the resulting loss in quality, stolen/lost autonomy, creation of a command and control environment, increasing number of periodic performance evaluations, and finally periodic layoffs.

The changes did not take long.  Two years at most.  But they, and their resulting culture, lasted for much longer.

I eventually left the company.  I knew I was a valuable part of my team, but I was extremely frustrated with many of the negative turns the company had made, as well as some of the decisions my immediate co-workers had made.  I needed to get out to preserve my sanity.  Or so I thought.

I let my manager know I had another job offer, and I had already accepted it.  I gave my two-week notice.  He begged me to stay.  I asked him “If the company values me so much, why doesn’t anyone feel this way?”

Two hours later I got a meeting request from the CTO.  I was to bring all of my improvement suggestions to him, for discussion, first thing the next morning.  Improvement suggestions?  The CTO!?!

I went home and immediately started writing down everything I thought was wrong with the company and how they could improve the working relationships with their employees.  From problems with retention of talent, to employee happiness, to wage inequality, etc.  It ended up being a 3 page long handwritten bulletized list.  I was proud and scared at the same time.

The next morning I handed the papers across the CTO’s desk, and we had a 3 hour long conversation about why I was leaving, the devolution of morale at the company, my unwillingness to stay, his failure (his words not mine) to his employees, and much more.  This is saying a lot about a man who repeatedly would blow off scheduled meetings and short people on their time to talk with him.  Our meeting was only scheduled for 30 minutes.

I left that meeting feeling extremely valued.  Exactly what I wanted all along.  I was shocked, because nowhere in those three handwritten pages had I even come close to mentioning that a deep face-to-face conversation, with the CTO focused on me as an important employee, was enough to restore my hope in the company.  But that did the trick!

Out of foolish pride, I left anyway.  I wasn’t always as enlightened as I am today.  I’m still not as enlightened as I wish to be.  So I made mistakes.  And I will make mistakes.  Leaving the company at that point was probably a mistake.

After I left the company, it took me six weeks to meet with the CTO again and ask to come back.  He agreed.  He wanted me to see the changes that he was making.

I returned to the office (with a raise and promotion) after 10 weeks of absence.  I found a foosball table and a conference room had been transformed into a game room (the newest Nintendo® and XBOX® game systems installed with many games for each).  These were suggestions I had made.

But during those 10 weeks of absence, I realized I was wrong three different ways.  #1 for leaving.  #2 my suggestions were based on short-term gratification. #3 I never brought up any of my suggestions at the times they occurred to me over the last several years.

Just as you might guess, these improvements, and a few more over a short period of time, had an immediate positive effect on employee morale.  But, long-term systemic change had not been addressed.  Frequent performance evaluations still remained.  Deadlines were a constant source of stress.  Development was not focused on building Quality into the product, so it had to be tested out of the product afterwards.  Layoffs became more frequent, and the culture of fear quickly resumed, after the shine of the foosball table dimmed.

The EX had only gotten better for a short period of time.  Eaten alive by the terrible system that was still in place.  Like painting and waxing a rusty automobile, without grinding away the rusty bits first.

Agility is defined slightly differently by almost everyone in our industry.  To me it speaks of a company culture that I would love to work in.  During my entire career, I can think of only a few years when I worked in an environment that I can confidently describe as Agile.  All other environments were either deviating further and further from Agility, or trying everything they could think of to get closer to Agility (with varying levels of short-term success).

While hearing Mike Beedle’s words about Employee Experience echoing in my head, I blend them with Craig Larman’s.  Craig saying that cultural change follows only if there is systemic change, makes clear sense to me these days.

Today, when large organizations want me to help them change their culture, I try to refocus them on their system and how they are providing a long-term gratifying Employee Experience.  Cultural change will follow, and thus Customer Experience.

Why Is LeSS Authentic? Why Should Leadership NOT Exempt Itself from Learning LeSS?

Large Scale Scrum (LeSS) is the agile framework that has a history of implementations, trials & errors, experiments and experience reports collected and documented throughout a decade.
LeSS is Scrum, performed by multiple teams (2-8) that work on the same widely defined product, for the same Product Owner.
LeSS stresses the importance of organizational descaling (a.k.a. flattening) that needs to happen before agility can be scaled.  The first LeSS book (out of three published so far) was written in 2008 and it had incorporated the ideas of its two authors, C. Larman and B. Vodde, by mainly including their own experiences of initial LeSS adoptions, from years before.
Overall, LeSS journey has begun many years before Large Scale Scrum has been officially presented to the world and recognized, as a framework, and this is important to acknowledge.  But why?    

Because LeSS, unlike some other very popular and commercially successful frameworks, that are very easy to ‘unwrap and install’, was not invented re-actively, as a “quick fix/hot patch”, in response to growing market trends and business needs (commercial driver).

LeSS is authentic.  LeSS took its time to mature and cultivate, as a philosophy and way of thinking, not as a revenue-generating utility.  LeSS did it at its own pace, without a rush, while incorporating learning of many coaches and companies that went through LeSS adoptions, over years.   LeSS has naturally “aged”, in a good sense of this word 😊.

Important Point: Whereas, deep learning of system dynamics and organizational design is equally available to everyone who attends LeSS training, not everyone can equally impact-fully apply this learning, when they go back to work.  But why?

Lots of LeSS learning (through system modelling, using causal loop diagrams) touches upon organizational elements, such as HR norms and policies, reporting structures, career paths and promotions, location/site strategies, budgeting/finance processes, etc. – things that are considered to be “untouchable” for an average person (employee).

Of course, it does not mean that an average person is not able to start seeing things differently (they definitely do!) after studying LeSS but it is just that he may not have enough power/influence to make necessary organizational changes that are required by LeSS.  In fact, for many people, this newly gained knowledge which is no longer possible to “unlearn” 😊 (e.g. ability think systemically), is accompanied by realization of one’s own powerlessness – and could be pretty frustrating.

Things are different for people that occupy higher organizational positions.  A senior leader is able to combine the decision-making power that is given to him by his organization and the power of newly obtained knowledge, coming from LeSS training.  These two powers, united, can have an amplified effect.

Notably, a senior leader who wants to apply LeSS learning to improve his organization must have something else that is very special, in addition to just having general curiosity of the subject and desire to experiment: it is called a ‘sense of urgency’.  The best examples of senior leaders that have learned LeSS and then applied learning to reality, came from situations, where the need to change was urgent and separated success from failure.  Then, if the above is true, the formula of LeSS adoption success becomes:

(Organizational Power + Power of Knowledge)  x Sense of Urgency = Success of LeSS adoption

Important Point: It is strongly not advisable for senior leaders to delegate LeSS learning to people that are below them organizationally and therefore, not empowered to make organizational changes. Granted, individuals at all organizational levels will be benefited from learning LeSS (it is a great eye opener).  But senior leaders – people that are empowered to make significant organizational changes, must attend LeSS training in person and not delegate attendance to their subordinates.  Leadership should not exempt itself from learning.
In fact, and ideally, senior leadership should attend LeSS training, accompanied by their respective organizational verticals, so that everyone goes through the same learning journey together.  Having HR and finance people, alongside with C-level executives and staff members of lower organizational levels – is a HUGE BONUS.

May 19-22: Global Scrum Alliance Gathering | AUS-TX

An amazing 2019 Global Scrum Alliance Gathering (May 19-22), organized by SA staff that brought together a record-high number of professionals from around the globe and had countless amazing events – too many to describe them all in one newsletter. 🙂
Here, I would like to  recap what committed to my memory the most:
  • Keynote presentation by Daniel Pink
  • My personal experience from servicing the ‘Fans of LeSS’ booth, attended by hundreds of people
  • Highlights of my own presentation that draw more than 100 people: “How to Stop Deterioration of Coaching Quality: Industrially and Organizationally” and feedback from the room
  • Coaches Clinic and Coaches/Trainers Retreat highlights 

Keynote Presentation by Daniel H. Pink

During his keynote presentation, Daniel H. Pink (the best-selling author, contributing editor and co-executive producer, known world-wide) shared the highlights of his new book: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing.

Pink’s Synopsis: “We all know that timing is everything. Trouble is, we don’t know much about timing itself. Our business and professional lives present a never-ending stream of ‘when’ decisions. But we make them based on intuition and guesswork. Timing, we believe, is an art.  But timing is a really a science – one we can use to make smarter decisions, enhance our productivity, and boost the performance of our organizations.

Some highlights from Pink’s talk:

Scientifically and statistically, both humans and apes, have the lowest well-being at mid-life.

Therefore, D.Pink’s recommendation on how to deal with such unpleasant mid-points, are as follows:

  • Beware [of such mid-points]
  • Use midpoints to wake up rather than roll over
  • Imagine you’re a little behind

Then, D. Pink also stressed that there are hidden patterns of how time-of-day affects our analytic and creative capabilities – and how simple work rearrangements can improve our effectiveness. For example, when a person makes an appointment to a physician, it is best to ask for a morning time slot, instead of afternoon slot, since physicians tend to have more analytical capabilities before lunch.

D. Pink’s next point was that as individuals get older, at the end of each decade, they are more prone to take certain actions that psychologically make them feel younger. As an example, he used statistical data of marathon runners: people are most likely to run their first marathon at the ages that are just at the brink of next decade: e.g. 29 or 49 years old.

“Because the approach of a new decade… functions as a marker of progress through the life span…people are more apt to evaluate their lives as a chronological decade ends, than they are at other times.”- Daniel H. Pink
How about psychological reaction to the fact that something will be GONE and the time when it will happen is coming up shortly?

In one case study (left image), when a person was given one chocolate candy at a time, and was asked to give feedback about its taste, a response was usually consistent, for each subsequent candy. However, as soon as a person was told that it was the last candy to taste, feedback about how a candy tasted became significantly more positive.

In another case study (right image), when a group of people was asked to fill out a survey, in order to receive a certificate, before it expired, responses were different, when conditions were set as “will expire in 3 weeks” vs. “will expire in two months”.  Apparently, proximity of expiration date made people much more responsive to the request to fill out a survey.

D.Pink’s next point was about how half-time checks can shape our behavior and impact final results. According to D. Pink, scientists and researchers really like statistical data from sports because it is ‘clean’.  Here, using an example of basketball teams, when teams play a game, the following can be observed, depending on half-time results:

  • Being significantly behind – usually results in a loss
  • Being significantly ahead – usually results in a victory
  • Being slightly behind – motivates people to step up and put an extra effort, which results ultimate victory
  • Being slightly ahead – makes people relaxed, less focused and less persuasive, which results in ultimate loss

As such, there is a conclusion:

“Being slightly behind (at half-time) significantly increases a team’s chance of winning” –D.Pink

Fans of LeSS Corner
A small group of Certified Scrum Trainers and Certified Enterprise-Team Coaches, supported the Large Scale Scrum (LeSS booth):  Fans of LeSS.

At least a few hundred people has come by the booth, asking for information about LeSS.
The booth servants received the following three biggest take-away points:

  • Unfortunately, still not too many people are aware of LeSS.  This is not to be confused with attempts or successes of adoption.  Rather, this is about general knowledge of what LeSS is. Ironically, the booth was labeled “Area 51” – the world’s best kept secret :).
  • Once being explained what LeSS is, how simple and common-sense it is, for many people, it has become an ‘AHA’ moment. The most awakening moment was understanding the difference between ‘global and local optimization’, ‘deep and narrow, as opposed to broad and shallow’, ‘owning vs. renting’.
  • Amazingly, how many people shared the same, almost standard complain/pain-point: “… we are currently using a very complicated, monolithic and cumbersome process (usually referring to some widely marketed XYZe framework), with multiple organizational layers involved,… and it creates lots of overhead, waste and friction,… practically nothing has changed in our workplace since the time we adopted it…same people, same duties and responsibilities (practically) BUT different terms, labels and roles … We really don’t like what we have to deal with now and our senior management is also frustrated but it seems that there is really nothing we can do to fix it at the moment…“.

“How to Stop Deterioration of Agile Coaching Quality: Organizationally, Industrially?” (my own presentation)

The goal of my presentation (Gene is here) was to discuss with the audience:

  • What is the problems’ origin [as it is derived from the title]?
  • Examples of the problem’s manifestation?
  • How can we solve the problem?

Throughout the course of my presentation I:

  • Exposed some classic systemic dysfunctions that sit upstream to the problem in scope.
  • Gave some examples of the problem, by using cartoons and satire
  • Delineated between the problem aspects, coming from outside organizations vs. siting on inside
  • Described types of internal (organizational) coaching structures that are to be avoided vs. tried
  • Gave some suggestions on what to avoid vs. what to look for in a good coach
  • Gave additional recommendations to companies, coaching-opportunity seekers and companies’ internal recruiters

“Download Presentation as PDF”


…and a some additional highlights from the gathering….
The Coaches Clinic – for 3 days
This traditional ‘free service’ by Scrum Alliance Enterprise and Team coaches and trainers what at the highest ever: 300 people were served in total,  over  course  of  3 consecutive days.


Certified Enterprise & Team Coaches and Scrum Trainers Retreat – Day 0:

This year brought together the biggest ever number of CECs-CTCs and CSTs.  One of the most important themes that was elaborated: how important it is for guide-level agile experts (CECs, CTCs, CSTs) to unite together in a joint effort to change the world of work.

Note: Thanks to Daniel Gullo (CST-CEC), who generously created for each attending Certified Enterprise Coach – colleague a memorable gift: Coach’s Coin with The Coach’s Creed:

  • CARITAS: Charity, giving back, helping others
  • COMMUNITAS: Fostering community and interaction
  • CONSILIARIUM: Counseling, consulting, The art of coaching
2020 Global Scrum Alliance Gathering is in NEW YORK(registration is not open yet)

Sept 13 -14 | 3rd Global LeSS Conference | NYC


Unforgettable 2 days at the 3rd Global LeSS Conference, at Angel Orensanz Foundation – the historical landmark in NYC.


Conference Space and Our People
Experience Report by Guest-Blogger Ram Srinivasan

Though I have been associated with the Large Scale scrum (LeSS) community for about five years (though the “community” did not exist,  I can think of my association with like minded folks) this is my first LeSS conference. While I used to attend a lot of conferences in the past, I have started focusing more on deep learning (by attending focused workshops) than focusing on conferences. But this year, I had to make an exception for the LeSS conference Why (a) it was the first LeSS conference in North America  (b) It was not very far and (c) I was thinking that I might meet some of the smartest people in the LeSS community whom I may not meet otherwise and (d) I have heard that it is a “team based” conference (unlike other conferences where you are on your own) and I wanted to find out what the heck it was. I was not disappointed.

The venue itself was very different from the conventional Agile conferences  – not a hotel. That definitely caught my attention !! I was pleasantly suprirsed to see both Howard Sublet (the new Chief Product Owner from Scrum Alliance) and Eric Engelmann  (the Chairman of the Board of Director of Scrum Alliance ).  Howard and I had good discussions on LeSS, Scrum Alliance, the marketplace, and scaling
Some sessions that I attended and major takeaways:
  • Day 1 morning keynote –  Nokia LTE  implementation  – Takeaway – Yes, you can do Scrum with more than 5000 engineers
  • Day 2 keynote  by Craig Larman. I always find Craig’s thinking fascinating and learnt quite a few interesting facts about cognitive biases (and strategies to overcome them).
  • LeSS Games – component team and feature team simulation lead by Pierluigi Pugliese – very interesting simulation – I used a variation of this in my CSM class past weekend and people liked it. I hope to write about sometime, in the coming days
  • LeSS roles exercise by Michael James –  I have always been a fan of MJ. Very interesting exercise which reinforces the concept of LeSS roles
  • TDD in a flip chart – Guess I was there again, with MJ. Well, just learned that you do not need a computer to learn about TDD.
  • An open space session with Howard Sublett on LeSS and Scrum Alliance partnership (yours truly was the scribe) – Lot of interesting discussions on market, strategy, and positioning of the LeSS brand.  I personally got some insights from Rafael Sabbagh and Viktor Grgic.
Two days was short !! Time flew away.  It was a great experience !! And  I wish we could have a North American LeSS conference every year !!

Experience Report by Guest-Blogger Mark Uijen de Kleijn

I’ve attended the 2018 LeSS Conference- my first – in the Angela Orensanz Center in New York. I was really inspired by the many great speakers, experiments and experiences and was glad I could help Jurgen de Smet by his workshop on Management 3.0 practices that can complement LeSS with experiments.

A couple of notes on the Conference; it has been the first Conference I attended in years where I actually learned a lot, either from the many speakers, experiments and experiences, but from my ‘team’ as well. As the LeSS Conference is a team-based conference, we reflected on the content and our insights during the Conference, which accelerated my learnings.

As I use many games and practices in organizations or courses, I’ve seen several great new games that I can use myself. The ‘building agile structures’ game of Tomasz Wykowski and Justyna Wykowska was the most outstanding game for me, because it makes the differences between component and feature teams very clear when scaling work, and I will use this for sure in the future. The experiences at Nokia by Tero Peltola were very inspiring and especially the focus on the competences (of everybody) and technical excellence I will take with me.Thoughts that will stick with me the most after the conference: the focus on technical excellence (including e.g. automation, code quality, engineering practices etc.) and the importance of the structure of the organization, following Larman’s fifth law ‘Culture follows structure’. The latter I’m already familiar with, but needs to be reprioritized in my mind again. The former will be my main learning goal the coming period and I will need to dust off my former experiences.

Interesting quote to think about, by Bas Vodde: ‘we should maximize dependencies between teams’ (to increase collaboration between teams).


Games and Team Activities

LeSS Graphic Art


My partner in crime (Ari Tikka) and me  – Presenting on Coaching

Click here to download presentation: Ari’s deck | Gene’s deck.


Personal Memorable Moments


Next LeSS conference (2019) – Munich, Germany

Agile Flyer – 03-25-2017

CHALLENGES WITH AGILE TRAINING:
EXAMPLES, REASONS, CONSEQUENCES

Virtual networks of professional agile coaches and trainers is good place to pick up some most thoughtful and provocative agile discussions.
The most reputable networks that I know of, and happen to belong to, are the communities of:
Certified Enterprise Coaches and Certified Scrum Trainers (both, from Scrum Alliance),
and Candidate Large Scale Scrum Trainers and Coaches (both, from LeSS company).
These communities are great because there we continuously share our experiences and learn from one another.
The summary below is the result of one such in-network discussions that spans in duration for more the a year.
It is focused on in-class training experiences and highlights –
some of the most common challenges that we encounter with our students in pre-, in- and post-classroom situations.
Some of our observations are specific to private classes, some – to public and some – to both.
Below, are some of the common challenges with Agile Training that we face:

  • Training “Wrong” Attendees with “Wrong” Intentions
  • Training “Certification Collectors“
  • Influence of Past Quasi-Agile Experience or Misguidance
  • Lack of Pre-Training (Self-Study)
  • Attempts to Change Training Content to “Conform to Reality”
  • Attempts to Steer Training Content towards “Unique Situations”
  • Requests for Exemption from Training by “Special” People
  • Lack of Classroom Participation
  • Too Much Reliance on Training Materials

-Read more…

 


More Selected Periodicals:

Scrum and Kanban at the Enterprise and Team Levels

Scrum, as the most structured of all Agile frameworks, is a great way to ensure predictable, strategically planned, incremental product delivery.
Scrum ensures good responsiveness to frequently changing market demands.
Although nonprescriptive, Scrum clearly defines certain roles, responsibilities, and ceremonies.

Kanban, for the most part, is silent about certain aspects that Scrum suggests explicitly (e.g., team size, velocity, story point estimation, timeboxing,
Scrum ceremonies, etc.). Kanban is less structured than Scrum. Being a true pull-based system,
Kanban is a great work-flow visualization tool that can be effectively used for WIP management.
It is a great tool to use in production support or the gradual redesign of legacy systems; business priority-driven new product development
is not the main goal….

-Read more…


Motivation 3.0 Is Required to Transition from Tribe Stage 3 to 4

In his book Drive, Daniel Pink says that when it comes to motivation, there’s a gap between what science knows and what business does.
Our current business operating system is built around external, carrot-and-stick motivators — which don’t work and often do more harm than good.
We need a system upgrade. And the science shows the way.

This new approach has three essential elements:

  1. Autonomy: The desire to direct our own lives
  2. Mastery: The urge to make progress and get better at something that matters
  3. Purpose: The yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves

-Read more…

Fresh Collection of Ad-hoc Agile References:

I continuously collect articles and publications that come from everywhere: colleagues, coaches and trainers, clients, occasional encounters.
I keep a comprehensive list of resources here, categorized by themes.
Some of my most recent samples from the collection are below:

 

Agile Flyer – 02-05-2017

 


Unspoken Agile Topics

/re-printed from its original version/
This paper, originally written in February 2013, brings to light some of the least-discussed topics and consequences of “broadband agilization” that currently take place in the industry.
The materials of this paper are subdivided into two general sections:

  • The first section describes certain impacts that Agile has on individuals and their personal career advancements.
  • The second section describes organizational-level Agile impacts that pertain more to client companies that undergo Agile transformation,
    as well as service-providing vendor companies that deliver Agile-transforming expertise to their respective clients.

The reader will most likely focus on the section that best represents his primary interests and concerns.
However, it is recommended that both sections are read in full, as in unison they create a better holistic perspective of the industry changes brought about by Agile-mania.
Read more…


Mentoring Coaches
(New Virtual Mentoring Program)

“How can credible, guide-level agile professionals that have sufficient amount of experience and a proven track record in coaching and leadership make themselves stand out?”
Read more…

Agile Self-Assessment Maturity Matrix
(…or how people self-reflect on their agile journey…)

A few weeks ago, I had a pleasure attending Scrum @ Scale course, taught by Jeff Sutherland.  One of the in-class exercises that spanned across the entire duration of the class was having students make an assessment of their respective organizations, in various dimensions of agile maturity,
as they were discussed in class. The areas covered are displayed in image (below), in the left column.  The dimensions of agile maturity discussed were: Prioritization, Delivery, Refactoring, Continuous Improvement, Strategic Vision, Release Planning, Release Management, Feedback loops, Metrics/Transparency and others.
To “grade” (assess) the state of maturity for any given dimension, people used a grading legend (right image below).
Post-it notes of different color were used to make graphic illustration more visual.  It was pretty revealing to see so much orange color on the wall – indicative of situations with partial blockage/impediments.



(The next Scrum @ Scale course taught by Jeff Sutherland is on March 2-3, in Boston, MA.)

More upcoming Agile Events in NYC:

Agile Flyer – 01-08-2017

 


Kicking off 2017….

Non-IT Kanban Implementation at Scale

/re-circulating my older post/

A few days ago, I went to the happy hour of a local staffing firm that specializes in placing Agile technical and leading resources.
They had moved in to their new office and were treating (I’ve known these guys for a number of years and was not looking for a job).
As I was walking around the office, what caught my eye were a few huge whiteboards attached to the walls.
One of the boards was in the recruiting area, another one in the account-opening area. I moved closer to see what was on them.

Both boards had multiple columns and rows. I focused on the column headers of one of the boards.
Most of the columns looked like sequential steps of one long process: resume submission of a job seeker to a client company.
I took a closer look at the other board and, after a few minutes of interpreting its column headers, realized that the board represented the steps in the account-opening process.
The boards did not seem to be related and they seemed to be maintained by different teams — one by recruiting, another one by account opening.
I looked around for a few more minutes and then asked the regional director to validate my observations and assumptions.

This is what I found out: – Read more…

More upcoming Agile Events in NYC:

July 7 – LeSS Talks: Framing a perspective: LeSS, Nexus, Scrum @ Scale, SAFe

This event was about comparing and contrasting the following four known scaled agile frameworks:

The discussion was very engaging but conclusive and many topics remained to-be-discussed in a future.

Below, please find the post by one of the participants and contributors at the meetup: Sevina Sultanova:


sel_sulScaled Agile comes in different flavors. Knowing the differences and similarities between various Agile frameworks can be largely beneficial, to put organizations at ease BEFORE they get underway with Agile Transformation, while with either of the frameworks: LeSS, Nexus, Scrum @ Scale, and SAFe.

Consider the recent LeSS in NYC meetup event in which attendees gathered around the virtual canvas projected onto the wall with goal of creating a perspective about the frameworks and comparing/contrasting them across multiple Agile dimensions (e.g., dependencies, optimization, overall structure, artifacts, ceremonies/events, teaming, ability to improve system design, roles/responsibilities, strengths, challenges, etc.).

meetup_collaboration

The participants were provided with a lightweight reference for each framework in the form of virtual stickies to “move” around across the table, in order to understand the differences of the various scaling frameworks.

What I found particularly interesting was a discussion about the differences between SAFe and LeSS initiated by one of the attendees. Here are a few highlights from this discussion:

Topics

SAFe

LeSS

Solving dependencies Coordinates people People work with technology
Cost of dependencies Coordination is seemingly necessary waste Learning to work with technology is investment
Optimization Resource coordination Outcome optimization
Batch size [1]  Planning cycle 3 months. Big batch of work to reduce total cost. [1] Planning. Sprint-long iterations to enable fast feedback
Main control mechanism [2] Bureaucratic [2] Clan
Customer contact Intermediated Direct
Organizational maturity Possible with lower skill. Learning for the role “Natural” Development Higher skill needed. Learning what is needed. Skilled evolution,  leading learning

Take away: Embracing either framework is simple yet not easy as technology, competence, identities and culture need to develop.

As Edgar H. Schein says, “There will always be learning anxiety…Learning only happens when survival anxiety is greater than learning anxiety.”  [3] Like with any enduring change, learning requires time though there is sure to be some worry and resistance.

References:

  1. [1] Stefan Thomke and Donald Reinertsen, Six myths of Product Development,” Harvard Business Review. May, 2012.
  2. [2] William G. Ouchi. A Conceptual Framework for the Design of Organizational Control Mechanisms. Management Science, Vol. 25, No. 9. (Sep., 1979), pp. 833-848.
  3. [3]  Edgar H. Schein, The Anxiety of Learning,” Harvard Business Review. March, 2002.

If you have any questions for Sevina, please contact her directly here